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ENGLAND
Samuel Pepys
Elizabeth I
London's Underworld
Fleet Marriages.
The Cries of London
Updated.




London is to the politician merely a seat of government, to the grazier a cattle market, to the merchant a huge exchange, to the dramatic enthusiast a congeries of theatres, to the man of pleasure an assemblage of taverns... the intellectual man is struck with London as comprehending the whole of human life in all its variety, the contemplation of which is inexhaustible.

-- James Boswell



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London's PeopleLondon's Costermongers: Index
Posted by Bill McCann on (297 Reads)
In 1862, Henry Mayhew published his magnificent survey:London Labour and the London Poor. He opens the first volume with a detailed survey of the class of people who make their living on the streets of the metropolis, known as Costermongers. He then goes on to describe the varieties of people in each class. Below is an index to all 48 articles in the series. The links will be updated regularly as the articles are posted.



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London's PeopleLondon's Costermongers: 3 - The Varieties of Costermongers
Posted by Bill McCann on (209 Reads)
In 1862, Henry Mayhew published his magnificent survey: London Labour and the London Poor.He now defines for us the differtent types of Street-Folk to be found in London. Of these, the costermongers are a special breed, or even distinct race, who seldom associate with the other groups. Of Irish extraction, fully one half of the Costermongers have been in the trade for many generations and refer to many of the other street-folk as the illegitimates."



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London's PeopleLondon's Costermongers: 2 - The Numbers of Costermongers
Posted by Bill McCann on (1100 Reads)
In 1862, Henry Mayhew published his magnificent survey: London Labour and the London Poor.He now comes to estimate the number of Costermongers who make regularly scrape a living from London's markets. He finds that this shifting population is increasing at a rate faster than the general metropolitan population. By visiting each of the "green" and "fish" markets and surveying the 2,000 miles of streets in London, he is able to come up with a reasonable, but surprising, estimate. On the way he finds wild fluctuations: The Strawberry season doubles the numbers at Covent garden market and the summer months see the number at Leadenhall slashed in half. And there were some surprises, Borough Market could not survive without them and they are more popular than respectable Fishmongers at Billingsgate!



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London's PeopleLondon's Costermongers: 1 - The Street Folk
Posted by Bill McCann on (1062 Reads)
In 1862, Henry Mayhew published his magnificent survey: London Labour and the London Poor. He opens the first volume with a detailed survey of the class of people who make their living on the streets of the metropolis, known as Costermongers. He then goes on to describe the varieties of people in each class. He begins with a general survey of the types of Street-Folk he encountered. He arranges them in six broad classes, which include Street-Sellers, Street-Finders and Working Pedlars. The Street sellers are the largest group, making up almost 75% of those who made their living on the streets. The range of items, or services, for sale is huge. Amongst the eatables we find sheep's trotters, hot green peas, and cat and dog meat! There were also marvels such as horses with six legs or two heads, industrious fleas or pig-faced ladies to be seen!



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London's PeopleMayhew's London Prostitutes: Completed
Posted by Bill McCann on (1518 Reads)
In 1862, Henry Mayhew published his analysis of the prostitution business in London. It formed a part of his magnificent survey: London Labour and the London Poor, extracts from which we continue to publish on this site. In the final extract, Mayhew defines for us the five classes of cohabiting prostitutes that were to be found in London. These include incestuous relationships, as then defined, including marrying a deceased wife's sister, and the Lorettes. Finally, we hear the harrowing story of a young high-spirited intelligent girl, seduced by fraud and violence.



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London's PeopleVictorian Etiquette XVI: The Gentleman
Posted by Bill McCann on (849 Reads)
The London Journal, launched in 1845, was one of the most widely read publications of nineteenth-century Britain. Its weekly appearance ushered in the period when mass-market reading, in a modern sense, was born. Between April 12 and August 30 1845, the Journal carried seventeen articles under the heading "Etiquette for the Millions," written by G.W.M Reynolds. They were clearly aimed at educating the mass readership (mostly the newly emerging middle-classes) in the behaviour expected of them in public. At times trenchant, the views expressed in the articles describe a view of society that is very, very different from that which we experience today. But, perhaps, one that many sections of modern society hanker after. In this set of instructions we are told precisely what does and does not make a gentleman!



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London's PeopleVictorian Etiquette XV: Miscellaneous Reflections
Posted by Bill McCann on (622 Reads)
The London Journal, launched in 1845, was one of the most widely read publications of nineteenth-century Britain. Its weekly appearance ushered in the period when mass-market reading, in a modern sense, was born. Between April 12 and August 30 1845, the Journal carried seventeen articles under the heading "Etiquette for the Millions," written by G.W.M Reynolds. They were clearly aimed at educating the mass readership (mostly the newly emerging middle-classes) in the behaviour expected of them in public. At times trenchant, the views expressed in the articles describe a view of society that is very, very different from that which we experience today. But, perhaps, one that many sections of modern society hanker after. In this short piece he muses on the etiquette that must be observed by Royalty and notes the favourable reports of the behaviour of the young Queen Victoria. He also quotes Burke's unfavourable views on Lord Chesterfield, whose letters of advice to his son were widely read.



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London's PeopleMayhew's London Prostitutes: XI part 2
Posted by Bill McCann on (1552 Reads)
In 1862, Henry Mayhew published his analysis of the prostitution business in London. It formed a part of his magnificent survey: London Labour and the London Poor, extracts from which we continue to publish on this site. In this extract we are introduced to those who Mayhew classifies as Clandestine prostitutes. In this second part we meet female married women who have connection with men other than their husbands, and unmarried women who gratify their passion secretly. He tells us of a house in Regent Street where they go to "consummate their libidinous desires." And then, there is a suprprise meeting. . . ..



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London's PeopleMayhew's London Prostitutes: XI part 1
Posted by Bill McCann on (2081 Reads)
In 1862, Henry Mayhew published his analysis of the prostitution business in London. It formed a part of his magnificent survey: London Labour and the London Poor, extracts from which we continue to publish on this site. In this extract we are introduced to tnhose who Mayhew classifies as Clandestine prostitutes. In this first part we meet female operatives (by which he means office girls), ballet girls and maid servants. They are all amateurs, and have a variety of reasons ranging from hardship to extravagance for taking to the streets.



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London's PeopleVictorian Etiquette XIV: Morals
Posted by Bill McCann on (2367 Reads)
The London Journal, launched in 1845, was one of the most widely read publications of nineteenth-century Britain. Its weekly appearance ushered in the period when mass-market reading, in a modern sense, was born. Between April 12 and August 30 1845, the Journal carried seventeen articles under the heading "Etiquette for the Millions," written by G.W.M Reynolds. They were clearly aimed at educating the mass readership (mostly the newly emerging middle-classes) in the behaviour expected of them in public. At times trenchant, the views expressed in the articles describe a view of society that is very, very different from that which we experience today. But, perhaps, one that many sections of modern society hanker after. In this set of instructions we are instructed in the courtesies, decencies, amenities, and proprieties of civilised life.



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